Kasia Maroney Conservation, LCC



Fine art conservation and restoration in Trumansburg, NY

Recent before and after photos

Ceramic

  Before

This Tang Dynasty horse suffered massive shipping damage, breaking      into 11 pieces with many chips along the break lines of the soft ceramic.

After

Tang ceramic surfaces are absorbent and powdery, so fluid colorants should always be avoided -- even on newly added material.  So after repairing this horse, the chips were filled with a reversible, water-soluble plaster mixed with pigment powders to match the color and texture of the original surface.


Before

This Manteno blackware figural vessel was broken in 19 pieces, and was missing major portions of the rim and base.


After

It was carefully pieced back together using reversible adhesive, and the missing sections were cast and carved from synthetic resin.

 

Before

This ceramic sculpture bore sentimental value to its owner, but when she     inherited it, it came to her in pieces.  The  interior metal armature had       bent, cracking the overlaying ceramic and snapping many pieces loose. 

 After

The armature was bent back into place, the pieces were repaired, and missing sections were created and then in-painted with a matching spatter glaze. 

 

Before

This 20th century Zuni earthenware vase            was broken by a cleaning service.

  During

Because the clay body is so soft, the break        lines suffered major chipping.

  After

The finished restoration was the result of        careful filling and in-painting.

 

 Before

 

This ancient Chinese blackware cup was broken into 7 pieces,           including the failure of an old repair at the top of its stem.

  After

Blackware is very soft, and burnished but unglazed, so great care needs       to be taken with the surface.  The old glue on this cup was chemically removed,  the pieces were assembled, and missing portions were built.  

Frames  

  Before

 This large, late 18th century portrait frame        was missing sculptural elements on all 4 corners.

  During

The flaky gilded surface was sealed, then          new pieces were cast and carved.

  After

The new material was gilded and varnished.

 

Before

This early 20th century frame was broken in a move, and the piece            was lost.

   After

The missing piece was cast with a mold made from the other side of the frame, and colored to match.

 

Before

Over many years, environmental factors sometimes cause antique            frames to separate at the corners, which can crack and split                       any molded surface decoration.

  After

Often, a frame just needs a cleaning and minor restoration                             of its corners to restore its original beauty.

 

 Before 

This top of a full length 19th century mirror frame barely survived      massive water damage.  Big sections were lost, the steel armature was    bent and rusty, the overlaying plaster was friable, and much of the gilt    finish was gone.

 

After

The armature was straightened and sealed, new pieces were made, the plaster was consolidated, the entire frame was repaired, and large sections of it were regilded.

Gypsum plaster and other minerals

Before, left arm

Before, right arm

This 19th century plaster cast of an antique Roman sculpture of Diogenes          had suffered major damage and attempted repairs to both arms.

After, left arm

After, right arm

The arms were removed and cleaned, then pinned together with wooden dowels.  The damage and missing sections were filled with reversible plaster and pigment powders in acrylic emulsion. 


                                                 Before

 

This plaster cast of a Roman head from antiquity came to me after         someone had begun to attempt a repair.

After

Some of the old repair was taken apart, some was improved, and all the pieces were fit in.  After missing sections were created and chips were filled all the new material was painted to match the original surface.

 

Before     

  Before, back

          

This 4500 year-old South American Venus figure was carved              from   volcanic tuff stone.  It had been poorly repaired,                                and the details were obscured by discolored glue.

After           

 After, back

   

The old glue was cleaned from the surface of the figure.  Because of the physical delicacy of the stone and the chemical stability of the materials, the old repair was left intact, but to make the repair look less obvious, the chips and break lines were filled.   To help it blend with the color and texture of the stone, dry ground pigments were mixed with the filling material.

Glass

  Before

This small ancient Egyptian statue of Bastet is made of faience, which            is a kind of early proto-glass.  Its base had been glued firmly onto an     acrylic block.

 

  After

The sculpture was removed from the block and all the old glue was cleaned away.  Then, working with the client, I designed an easily-removable mount with a low center of gravity (for stability) that did not involve introducing any adhesives to the extremely fragile surface of the object.

Mixed organic media

  Before

Moisture and age had caused the wooden board support of this        Byzantine icon painting to crumble.

 After

The board was consolidated from the back, the paint layer was cleaned and varnished, and new, reversible paint was touched in over the damaged areas.

 

 Before

The paint on the body of this 18th century Ecuadorian hardwood doll           was actively flaking.

After

After a thorough cleaning, the original paint layer was consolidated and   sealed, then the colors were matched and applied over the top of the sealer.

Metal

Before

This ancient Egyptian bronze statue of Anubis was glued to a very light, tall base.                  A previous restoration of the figure's ankles fell apart, exposing layers of old repairs.

The figure was removed from the base, the old repairs were removed and restored,           and the corroded bottom edge of the bronze base was rebuilt.  

After

Then a new, low base was designed to include an armature that securely supports the figure at the waist.  The new mount eliminates the need to glue the bronze to the mount, and it also takes pressure off the fragile ankles.